How to Buy A Pen That Will Last Forever

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They can be easily distinguished from later production by several unique characteristics. All pens of this period are double jewels, meaning that they have a decorative “jewel” at the top of the cap and at the end of the barrel. The imprint on the majority of these pens is at the end of the barrel, near the decorative “jewel”, all in one line. Parker “51” Made in USA. They may or may not have a “1” datecode after the imprint. Some collectors speculate that the ones without a datecode are really pre-production models from Another explanation may be that they were never dated or that the datecode wore off on most instances the datecode is lightly imprinted to begin with. It should be noted that some examples have been found with the imprint up by the clutch ring, with a datecode of “1”. In addition, I have been able to inspect a demonstrator with the “1” imprint by the clutch ring and a rounded blindcap. In addition, in most, but not in all cases, the “first year” pens will have jewels made of aluminum.

Parker Date-Codes Reference

This is no ordinary pen. This is the ultimate modern fountain pen. You can carry it everywhere, travel with it, sit on it, toss it in your bag, knock it around, and it never fails you. This is the pen you’ll want to grab as you go out the door. And this is the pen most likely to grab everyone’s attention when you whip it out to jot a note.

Jul 02,  · Re: Help, dating Parker 51 pen It will have been manufactured after the end of 51 Vacumatic production, earliest likely date being late The pen .

Metal nibs have their origins as far back as ancient Egypt and were made of metals like copper and bronze. However, the quality of writing that could be achieved with these pens was inferior to that of reed pens. Metallic nibs were made up through the 18th-century as one-off, craftsman-made luxury items. Metal nibs are also easily manufactured to have different properties for different purposes.

Also, they can now be attached to and removed from holders, allowing one to switch between nibs with relative ease. Pointed nib, flexed and unflexed Pen nibs come in a variety of different shapes and sizes for different purposes but can be split into two main types: Broad nib[ edit ] The broad nib, also called broad-edge or chisel-edge, is the older of the two nib types. It is rigid and has a flat edge.

The pen is usually held at a constant angle to the horizontal; different scripts require different nib angles. Thick and thin strokes are created by varying the direction of the stroke.

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This article includes a list of references , but its sources remain unclear because it has insufficient inline citations. Please help to improve this article by introducing more precise citations. October Learn how and when to remove this template message Vacumatic and Aerometric Parker 51s The Parker 51 is a fountain pen introduced in Parker’s continued advertising during the war created a demand that took several years to fulfill after the end of the conflict.

A common misconception about Quink is that it was intended primarily for the Parker “51,” which generated over million dollars in sales during its thirty-year history.

The Parker 51 fountain pen is a classic writing instrument first put into production in , when the company celebrated its 51st anniversary in business. Parker made subtle and overt changes to 51 in the decades since the fountain pen was first introduced, although the basic design remains the same.

Jump to summary chart For those of us concerned with when a pen was made, Parker is the sweetest of all makers, in that many of their pen actually have a date printed right on them. Not only the year, but which quarter of the year, will appear, giving a very clear sense of just how old the pen is. While modern Parkers that follow this practice mark only the barrel or cap of the pen, vintage pens generally have a code on the barrel and on the point.

One generally takes the barrel as definitive of the age of the pen as a unit, since caps, barrels and blind caps were usually all made together, and swapping tends to show. This does not mean that a point whose date code does not agree with the barrel is necessarily a replacement. An other thing to not get too concerned about is finding a pen has lost its code.

Modern pens are much more likely to present their codes, but their codes are less easily understood.

Sean Parker

By Rick Propas [Note: A list of sources and additional reading is to be found at the end of this piece. Rather this is meant to be a readable introduction to Pelikans for beginning collectors and newcomers] The history of Pelikan begins with Germany’s industrial revolution in the early nineteenth century and continues into the global economy of today. During that period, the firm has consistently been a technological leader, even as its fortunes rose and fell.

Eight years later Wagner took over the business giving it his name and expanding it into office supplies.

The Parker 51 went into production in , and remained a best-seller for decades thereafter. The majority of examples in circulation, however, date from the s. Perhaps no other fountain pen has been so unanimously acclaimed as a classic.

She knew that some people would find it hard to understand the logic behind the idea, and she thought that if the rent problem and the Georgist solution to it were put into the concrete form of a game, it might be easier to demonstrate. She was granted the patent for the game in January The Landlord’s Game became one of the first board games to use a “continuous path”, without clearly defined start and end spaces on its board. His students made their own boards, and taught the game to others.

By this time, the hand-made games became known simply as Monopoly. This version, unlike her first patent drawing , included named streets though the versions published in based on her first patent also had named streets. Magie sought to regain control over the plethora of hand-made games. Layman, in turn, learned the game from the Thun brothers who later tried to sell copies of the game commercially, but were advised by an attorney that the game could not be patented, as they were not its inventors.

After the demand for the game increased, Darrow contacted a printing company, Patterson and White, which printed the designs of the property spaces on square carton boards. Darrow’s game board designs included elements later made famous in the version eventually produced by Parker Brothers, including black locomotives on the railroad spaces, the car on “Free Parking”, the red arrow for “Go”, the faucet on “Water Works”, the light bulb on “Electric Company”, and the question marks on the “Chance” spaces, though many of the actual icons were created by a hired graphic artist.

They rejected it in a letter dated May 31, Schwarz in New York City. Parker Brothers held the Magie and Darrow patents, but settled with Copeland rather than going to trial, since Copeland was prepared to have witnesses testify that they had played Monopoly before Darrow’s “invention” of the game.

Parker’s Date Coding Systems

Hallmarks and other markings 4. Date codes on Parker Pens Updated Oct In mid Parker began marking most pens and pencils with a date code, both the barrel and the nibs were marked, but lacking a date code doesn’t necessarily mean that the pen was made pre , since many imprints have been worn off with use. The first date codes, found for example on the Vacumatics, consists of two digits, the first one denoting the quarter of production, the second denoting the production year.

Hence a “47” marking on a ‘s pen indicate that the pen was produced in the fourth quarter of , not , which is a common misconception. In the second quarter of this system was however changed to save production time, and a new date code, using a system of dots, was adopted.

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How to Date a Parker 51 Fountain Pen James Clark Updated February 21, The Parker 51 fountain pen is a classic writing instrument first put into production in , when the company celebrated its 51st anniversary in business. Parker made subtle and overt changes to 51 in the decades since the fountain pen was first introduced, although the basic design remains the same. Learning about style changes in the Parker 51 will help you date a pen and perhaps locate a collector’s item, as these fine writing instruments are now considered to be.

Identify first-year models by the imitation jewels mounted on the end of the pen cap and the barrel end. The jewel on the end cap tassie is affixed to the top of the screw that holds the pocket clip in place. Almost every first-year model was engraved with a single-line imprint around the end of the cap barrel near the tassie. Parker 51 pens with two imitation jewels–one on the cap and another on the end of the pen barrel–remained in production until , although very few were made after

Dating parker 51 pens

Many people have a whole lot of pens, myself included, yet there are a select few in my collection that I would consider the best; the pens that, if I had to give up all my other pens, I would choose to keep. Limited editions are one of the main culprits that fit the bill here. Who really cares if there are only other pens like yours? Take, for example, the numerous LE Visconti fountain pens that seem to come out every week and come encased in boxes made from fine cedar and gold leaf.

Do you think they write better than your regular Visconti?

The Parker “51” took eleven years to develope but Parker sold over 20 million pens during more than 30 years! Parker spent the same amount in dollars to promote the pen, but in .

Modern Chinese pens Hero lacquered brass, 12k point, aerometric filler , c Whenever you hear an expert rattle off his or her list of the major pen-making nations of the planet, you seldom find China on that list. Why should this be so? After all, in the near-total lack of foreign competition, China must have made skeenteen gazillion pens just to satisfy its huge home market. Blame it on geographic or linguistic isolation, or maybe on a doctrinaire Marxist-Maoist government that until the last twenty years or so all but prohibited business development, luxury goods, and foreign trade as trappings of evil Capitalist Imperialism.

Or, you could attribute it to the rather crude and pedestrian finish of the earlier products, or their ahem derivative designs most were copies or pastiches of contemporary Sheaffers and Parkers. Things are different now, and a new generation of Chinese penmakers many based in China’s ‘business capital’ Shanghai are working hard to get their products into your hands. Helping them in this effort are novel designs, vastly improved quality and finish, and above all or below all rock-bottom prices.

If you like to collect interesting modern pens, you may still have an opportunity here to own some very rare and distinctive pieces without cashing in the K. Even if you’re not particularly interested in Chinese pens now, you may soon be. In addition to the “native” brands mentioned here and several more from Taiwan , the Chinese are already making pens for European and American manufacturers, and the quality of work combined with the low production costs suggest that this “outsourcing” will become more widespread in the future.

The go-to guy for Chinese pens is Norman Haase of http: Norman also appears at many pen shows, where you’ll have a chance to see and try these pens for yourself. A couple of notes on Chinese pens: Their points on home-market models at any rate tend to run rigid and fine, although they are branching out to suit the tastes of potential overseas buyers.

Profile: The Parker Vacumatic

They can be easily distinguished from later production by several unique characteristics. Some collectors speculate that the ones without a datecode are really pre-production models from Another explanation may be that they were never dated or that the datecode wore off on most instances the datecode is lightly imprinted to begin with. This is not the case.

Dating of Parker “51” pens is easy, down to the quarter it was made; at least for the barrel. Parker used a date system of one digit, surrounded by a series of dots to signify the quarter the pen was made in.

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Parker’s Date Coding Systems

Some sources indicate that the model was produced as far back as , there’s even a dating in the official Parker archives that states that one of the Victories in there was manufactured in This is however highly unlikely, for several reasons. First of all the Victories were manufactured in the UK only and it is highly unlikely that Parker and the Valentine Pen Company, which was later to become the UK Parker factory, had started their co-operation that early.

Secondly the name Victory indicates that the production was in line with the war effort, but by even if Hitler had begun his world domination planning, the war was still four years away. Thirdly most Victory pens have gold nibs clearly marked with an “N” to denote that they were made in Newhaven, an imprinting that begun only in

1. Date codes on Parker Pens. Updated Oct In mid Parker began marking most pens and pencils with a date code, both the barrel and the nibs were marked, but lacking a date code doesn’t necessarily mean that the pen was made pre, since many imprints have been worn off with use. The first date codes, found for example on the Vacumatics, consists of two digits, the first one .

Order Form Carter’s Ink Cubes This is the place to be for old ink bottles from the early s up to the s. Many of the bottles we have listed are strictly for the ink bottle collector. We also have a number of older ink bottles that still contain useable fountain pen inks which many fountain pen aficionados prefer over modern day inks. In addition to our selection of vintage ink bottles on this page, you’ll also find related items such as ink eraser fluids, rubber stamp inks and traveling ink bottle containers.

Embossed Sanfords on bottom. This bottle would have originally had a cork stopper, but the stopper is missing. Ink dust in bottle. Label in very good condition. Yellow, red and blue label with fountain pen illustrated.

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Click on the image for a larger view! The colours of the Vacumatic Parker 51’s and the Aerometric Parker 51’s. The Parker “51” took eleven years to develope but Parker sold over 20 million pens during more than 30 years! Parker spent the same amount in dollars to promote the pen, but in reached million dollars in sales.

Dating a “51” Pens made before Parker stopped date-coding its pens have a date code on the barrel. For instructions on reading this code, refer to Parker’s Date Coding Systems. Pens made after Parker stopped using date codes (early to mids) cannot be dated to a particular year, but you can at least narrow the possible range of years.

Home Dating A Pen Dating A Pen Dating a pre Parker 45 usually involves a little detective work and the results can be rather general to say the least, giving a rough idea rather then a specific date. Check for a date code on the side of the cap. These are usually found to the right of the country of manufacture. If the pen is boxed with paperwork in the box check the paperwork for a sale date.

This will tell us when the pen was sold, not when it was made. Some earlier US pens had a date code on the box indicating the year of manufacture. Model — Some models date from specific years or had identifying features during certain time periods. Example 1 Looking at the pen we have a Parker 45 Coronet in Green complete with box and paper work.

We know that the Coronet was first manufactured in so this alone would give a rough date of to Next we look at the box.

Parker 51 Vacumatic In Cedar Blue Review…


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